Before the Spring

The thing about this is that, in function, it was still working. The life of an object is an amazing way to move a story around. Like, here for example, if you think about the history that led up to this moment just after the storm.

First, the need for the traffic light to be put here in the first place. There must of have been some accidents on this corner that forced a street light to be put in. The lobbying that took place. The vote. The people that sat on the board. The families all affected on both sides of the accident. What about the person who designed the street light itself. At the inception of his idea. Late at night? Where were they?

The construction workers who built the light. The electricians who made it all go. The factory workers who put together the raw materials. All of it spanned over time, so if you can somehow, and by you and I am talking to myself here because I am trying to get how to mark time in a long historical piece now – if you put all of these things in a place and tell the story of each, you give significance to an object and allow the reader to feel something over time as that object wears down. It is a sense of sadness yes, but an emotion nonetheless, so when you see someone coming to repair this, you can raise the level of hope of the reader. In the same way, if you see it left is disrepair , you can give a feeling of hopelessness.

I try my hardest not to leave the reader with that feeling because then there is not a great take away. You must, however, take them on the journey so they can feel it all. So then, if you take them on the journey, I must go on the journey myself. Yes. See, a broken streetlight has really done wonders for how I am going to mark the story. Take a spot that is central to the story and age it over time. Timelines. I am going to be playing with timelines for the rest of the month. That is the fantastic part of telling an epic story arch, which I am looking forward to doing.

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